William Wordsworth's former home to become Buddhist retreat after being sold off for £2m

发布时间:2020-08-03编辑:admin阅读(458)

William Wordsworth's former home to become Buddhist retreat after being sold off for £2m politics 第1张Alfoxton Park Hotel estate near Bridgwater (Image: Christie & Co)Sign up to FREE email alerts from BusinessLive - South WestSubscribeWhen you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. OurPrivacy Noticeexplains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee ourprivacy noticeInvalid Email

A grade II listed building in Somerset that was once home to English poet William Wordsworth has been sold to a Buddhist charity for £2m.

Alfoxton Park Hotel estate, near Bridgwater, was bought by the Alfoxton Park Trust and will be renovated and turned into a retreat centre.

The deal was brokered by commercial real estate company Christie & Co.

The former country house hotel, which was built in the 18th century, is set in 51 acres of gardens and deer park.

It has 13,500 square foot of interior space spread out over four floors, 17 bedrooms, as well as outbuildings, a courtyard, and walled garden.

The new Buddhist retreat centre will focus on a mixture of longer meditation retreats, arts and creativity events, and land-based working retreats, according to Christie & Co.

Trustee Lokabandhu said: "We are delighted to have been entrusted with the guardianship of this beautiful and historic building.

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“We are very aware of its importance and place in Britain's literary heritage and fully intend to honour that going forwards.

“Once the building has been restored to at least something of its former glory, we'd love to welcome poets, pilgrims and lovers of nature - many of whom already pass by as they walk the Coleridge Way, which runs right past our back door."

According to Christie & Co, the estate housed US troops during World War II, and Wellington House School, in Kent, moved to the main house during the conflict.

The original house, The Manor of Alfoxton, is mentioned in the Domesday book, Christie & Co said, but was destroyed in a fire and rebuilt on the same site in 1710.

Stephen Champion, director at Christie & Co, added: “Alfoxton stood empty for a number of years and unfortunately suffered as a result.

“We are delighted to see the building saved by its new owners, the Alfoxton Park Trust, which plans to restore the property and run it as a Buddhist retreat centre.

“It is reassuring to see continued confidence in South West tourism businesses, despite the economic impact of Covid-19 on the sector.”

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